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#1

Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/15/2008 12:44pm   283 Views
  

We are having some issues with titles.  We value positions by job content and market data and have never paid much attention to titles.  We would like to clean up our titles a bit for our higher level staff positions. 

Currently we have Directors that are in a lower pay levels than some Managers and should be based on the job content.  We have done a great job of valuing the positions but in some situatins the titles are causing us issues.  

What specific differences (in your opinion) do you think there should be to be a Director VS. a Manager? 


Private12770

   
Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/15/2008 02:38pm  
  

Many companies use a matrix to develop language describing the various "steps" in their titling hierarchy.  You can create a template with Competencies along the top (eg., reporting relationship, breadth of management, job knowledge, judgement, organizational impact, interaction, nature of supervision and level of autonomy, and any others that suit your company) and then titles (roles) along the vertical axis.  Using this you'll create celss within which you need to create distinguishing characteristics (language) to separate the various levels.

This technique should help you avoid the title inflation that so often come with bogus titles.


Private10790

   
Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/15/2008 06:00pm  
  

Be aware that in some industries, like public utilities, managers tend to be higher than directors. 

Suggest you compare to your market benchmark titles and modify your applications accordingly, as adjusted by your "consistent" traditional patterns and your preferences.  Every organization essentially creates its own unique pecking order to suit its own unique taste, culture, traditions and intentions.

For example, the U.S. Navy uses a different ranking continuum than the one perfectly acceptable to the majority of the other branches of the military services.


Private34235

   
Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/16/2008 06:52am  
  
What are some of the differences that your firm recognizes? Also, are all of your positions in the same industry and geographical location?

Private10487

   
Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/17/2008 06:29am  
   (1 rating)

I am unsure if this is helpful - but here is a "cut and paste" of an old document we developed:

Director

A Director is an individual who provides direction and guidance to a number of diverse functional areas which typically form part of a major business unit within the organization.  This includes accountability for planning, budgeting and directing all activities across their functional areas.

 

A Director reports to an Executive for the purpose of establishing and regularly reporting on an annual plan that is consistent with the organization’s strategic plan. Typically, a Director has one or more managers, team leaders or specialists as direct reports and is responsible for providing them with the guidance, direction and performance management necessary to ensure that their business unit or functional area operates consistent with the business plans.

 

Manager

A Manager is an individual who provides guidance and direction to a unit or department of the business unit and determines schedules and assignments for work activities of direct reports, based on work priority, quantity of equipment and skill of personnel.  Their responsibilities include preparing and monitoring their department’s budgets and operating plans to ensure they are consistent with those of the business unit during the fiscal year.

 

A Manager is also responsible for all performance management activities within their department including hiring and disciplinary issues.  A manager will monitor the daily performance of, and approve the compensation review on, their direct reports.  They will also ensure that all other employees within their department receive the appropriate training and performance feedback, both formal and informal, through delegation to their team leaders, consultants or specialists where appropriate.

 

Typically a manager has one or more team leaders or specialists and other non-management employees reporting to them.

 


Private10408

   
RE: Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/17/2008 06:34am  
  
This is perfect. I have received some other responses but this is exactly
what I was looking for. Thank you.

________________________________

From: Compensation Listmanager
[mailto:Compensation.listmanager@webboard.worldatwork.org]
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2008 8:32 AM
Subject: Director VS. Manager


From: Mark Salvador



I am unsure if this is helpful - but here is a "cut and paste" of an old
document we developed:


Director


A Director is an individual who provides direction and guidance to a number
of diverse functional areas which typically form part of a major business
unit within the organization. This includes accountability for planning,
budgeting and directing all activities across their functional areas.



A Director reports to an Executive for the purpose of establishing and
regularly reporting on an annual plan that is consistent with the
organization's strategic plan. Typically, a Director has one or more
managers, team leaders or specialists as direct reports and is responsible
for providing them with the guidance, direction and performance management
necessary to ensure that their business unit or functional area operates
consistent with the business plans.




Manager

A Manager is an individual who provides guidance and direction to a unit or
department of the business unit and determines schedules and assignments for
work activities of direct reports, based on work priority, quantity of
equipment and skill of personnel. Their responsibilities include preparing
and monitoring their department's budgets and operating plans to ensure they
are consistent with those of the business unit during the fiscal year.



A Manager is also responsible for all performance management activities
within their department including hiring and disciplinary issues. A manager
will monitor the daily performance of, and approve the compensation review
on, their direct reports. They will also ensure that all other employees
within their department receive the appropriate training and performance
feedback, both formal and informal, through delegation to their team leaders,
consultants or specialists where appropriate.



Typically a manager has one or more team leaders or specialists and other
non-management employees reporting to them.






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Private10790

   
Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/17/2008 08:08am  
  

Confirm and concur with prior post.  These are all generalities, of course.

VP is an officer, typically a direct report to the CEO, and creates policy.

Director is typically a single department head reporting to a VP and directs policy implementation.

Manager reports to Director, and heads a functional work group.

Supervisors report to Managers and monitor staff task completion.

P.S.  Pay tends to have a positive correlation with such rank, but exceptions abound for exceptionally valued individuals with mission-critical skills/competencies and slots with inordinately different leverage on the bottom line from the norm of their peers.  I.e., key researchers with patents/reputations may be "mere senior professionals" managed by higher ranked but lower paid bureaucrats; and a Regulatory Affairs function may be paid far higher than same-level posts in mundane nonessential support roles.


Private10408

   
RE: [BULK] Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/17/2008 08:12am  
  
This is very helpful. Thank you.

________________________________

From: Compensation Listmanager
[mailto:Compensation.listmanager@webboard.worldatwork.org]
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2008 10:04 AM
Subject: [BULK] Director VS. Manager
Importance: Low


From: "E Brennan" (ej.brennan@erieri.com)



Confirm and concur with prior post. These are all generalities, of course.

VP is an officer, typically a direct report to the CEO, and creates policy.

Director is typically a single department head reporting to a VP and directs
policy implementation.

Manager reports to Director, and heads a functional work group.

Supervisors report to Managers and monitor staff task completion.




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You are receiving this email because you are subscribed to the Compensation
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Private10790

   
RE: [BULK] Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/17/2008 05:38pm  
  

Here's a brand new classification matrix that may help even more:  ERI's C3 (Compensation Competency Construct) Matrix, at http://www.erieri.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=datasearch.main

 

 


Private10408

   
RE: [BULK] Director VS. Manager  
Posted: 01/18/2008 06:30am  
  
Thanks so much!!

________________________________

From: Compensation Listmanager
[mailto:Compensation.listmanager@webboard.worldatwork.org]
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2008 7:42 PM
Subject: RE: [BULK] Director VS. Manager
Importance: Low


From: "E Brennan" (ej.brennan@erieri.com)



Here's a brand new classification matrix that may help even more: ERI's C3
(Compensation Competency Construct) Matrix, at
http://www.erieri.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=datasearch.main








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You are receiving this email because you are subscribed to the Compensation
mailing list and/or have chosen to watch a particular topic distributed by
the Compensation mailing list. See the instructions below to Unsubscribe to
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To reply:
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