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Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials are available online within one business day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access to e-course materials available online within one business day from the date of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
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Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
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WORKSPAN
CAREER CONFIDANT |

Life at Work: A Series of Projects and Good Outcomes

Donya Rose
Donya Rose, CSCP
Managing Principal, The Cygnal Group 

Donya Rose is managing principal of The Cygnal Group, located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She has more than 25 years of experience in leading the design and implementation of systems and processes to ensure alignment of sales results with top business priorities. Rose holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Davidson College, and a master’s degree in operations research and systems analysis from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Today, Rose focuses exclusively on sales compensation plan design.

What is the No. 1 career assist you received?
When I was a business planner at Raychem in the late ’90s, Tim Burch, VP of human resources, asked me to lead a project to build a global sales compensation framework and plans for the company. At that time, Raychem was at about $2 billion in revenue with offices in more than 60 countries and had never had a compensation plan for their highly regarded sales team. The lead consultant assigned happened to be Stock Colt, then-leader of the sales effectiveness and rewards practice at Towers Perrin. It was in the project and under the influence of Stock that I found my passion for a field I didn’t know existed.

At the end of our work together, with sales compensation plans ready to go, it was announced that Raychem was being acquired by Tyco. Within a few weeks I had reached out to Stock and asked him about the possibility of joining the practice at Towers Perrin, and within a few more weeks I had a new employer, new colleagues I still enjoy regularly and a career trajectory that continues to this day.

What key career advice would you give to others?
Be reliable. Mean what you say and say what you mean. If you make a commitment, keep it; and if you find you can’t keep your commitment, then provide early updates and an alternative plan. Be diligent, but not too diligent. Stay focused on the most important things. Do the hardest things at the time of day when you have the most energy and resilience (that’s mornings for me). Be as disciplined about finding balance and prioritizing your mental and physical health as you are about meeting work commitments. Be generous. Search for the good intentions and helpful contributions of those around you and bring attention to them. Offer your insights, experience, tools and techniques freely.

What are two out-of-the-ordinary skills every rewards professional needs?
1. Understanding of the basics of managerial accounting. Money is the lifeblood of business, supplying the potential for growth or de-emphasizing certain functions, business units or markets. To align the rewards function’s efforts with the top business priorities, it’s important to have a basic understanding of how resources are directed, what criteria leaders are using when they set budgets and establish targets and what outcomes define success or failure from a financial perspective.
2. Project management. Life at work is a series of projects. Doing the tasks well is essential for good outcomes. But equally essential is planning the work, identifying the steps, involving the right resources, managing the schedule, adjusting as needed and managing expectations of the team members and business leaders.