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Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials are available online within one business day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access to e-course materials available online within one business day from the date of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
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Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
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WORKSPAN
FROM THE EDITOR |

What We Talk About When We Talk About Money


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Dan Cafaro
Editor-in-Chief of Workspan magazine. 

I remember the first time someone asked me the amount of money I made as a sportswriter for a daily newspaper. I was in my early 20s and at a house party, so it wasn’t hard to sidestep the question, given the loud music and the long, awkward pause. Still, I was appalled at my friend’s rudeness. My meager salary, I thought, was none of his business.

A few decades later, my opinion on the subject hasn’t fundamentally changed. Although I no longer consider it taboo to discuss religion and politics in social settings (despite my mother’s admonishment), I take the high road when it comes to discussing my salary. As a self-conscious, private-sector employee, my annual income is a personal matter. Isn’t it?

Evidently not.

Five years ago, a Wall Street Journal article reported that comparing salaries among colleagues was no longer “a taboo of workplace chatter.” Many Millennials, the WSJ authors claimed, document their lives on social media and therefore are inclined to share and use salary information to negotiate pay rates.

Smart cookies, those Millennials. Now the largest generation in the U.S. workforce, they are leading the calls for pay transparency — the topic of this month’s cover story. And much like the hotbed issue of pay discrimination (see “The Push to Advance Pay Parity”), the climate appears poised for the scales of justice to tip and the tides of pay transparency to rise.

What does this mean for your company? Do you operate in a work environment that discourages people from talking about their pay? Or do you take it a step further and have a company policy that forbids and penalizes workers from disclosing their pay? If it’s the latter, then you better check in with an employment law attorney because you’re likely to be in violation of the National Labor Relations Act.

More importantly, what are your compensation/total rewards philosophy and salary data gathering practices? Does it cause you angst or embarrassment if your employee posts her salary on social media? If so, is it because you know you are paying below market value for what her job is worth, or do you just think it’s inappropriate?

Family health-care woes, financial struggles, age, gender and sexual discrimination, these aren’t exactly “small talk” topics, yet employees every day volunteer this information to commiserate with their peers, air their grievances and address social injustices. Is money the last taboo?

As with most complicated subjects, there is no black and white answer to the pay transparency question. Way too many variables and circumstances exist. Do the pros outweigh the cons for employers? What is the right level of pay transparency for your organization?

“Moderation is the best policy.” “Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.” These maxims embody the cautious underpinnings of most companywide initiatives and employment policies. Many seasoned rewards professionals would say for good reason. Radical transparency — a program that radically increases the openness of organizational process and data — may cause the opposite of what pay transparency intends to achieve (employee engagement, decreased turnover, increased satisfaction). Or it may produce a walk-off home run.

Let’s face it: What society once considered taboo is now fair game and commonplace to discuss. Our parents may have taught us to never talk about politics, religion or money at the dinner table. But perhaps true progress is achieved from talking about the things that no one really wants to talk about in polite company.

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