Close
Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials are available online within one business day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access to e-course materials available online within one business day from the date of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Close
Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
Close
Sorry, you can't add this item to the cart.
You have reached the maximum allowed quantity for purchase in your cart or the item isn't available anymore.
Product successfully added to your cart!
Price
View your cart
Continue shopping
Please note our website will be down this Friday, November 5 from 9pm ET – 11pm ET for routine maintenance. We apologize for any inconvenience.
WORKSPAN
WORKSPAN DAILY |

Benefits Considerations for Employers Amid Pending Roe v. Wade Decision

051122-benefits-780x450-SM.png

Amazon is one of the latest U.S. employers to announce it will cover its employees’ expenses when they travel to access non-threatening medical procedures, including abortions. Yelp, Uber, Citigroup and Match previously announced they have implemented policies designed to support their employees’ abortion rights.  

051122-KT-benefits.jpg

Amazon’s announcement comes on the heels of the leaked news that the U.S. Supreme Court is seemingly poised to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which would leave abortion laws up to individual states. Per Axios, there have been 86 bills to restrict or outright ban the procedure in 31 states this year; six have been enacted in 2022 and two have been blocked by lower courts.  

While some companies have been more vocal about their travel reimbursement policy being in response to the various state legislation, Amazon’s new policy is not specific to abortion, as the online retail giant will also reimburse employees for treatments such as cellular gene therapies, services for substance abuse and others. 

Specifically, the company will cover up to $4,000 in travel expenses, and the policy will apply if the medical treatment is not available within 100 miles of a U.S.-based employee’s home, and if remote care is not available. 

Randa Deaton, vice president of purchaser engagement at Purchaser Business Group on Health, said businesses are increasingly assessing their healthcare benefits to ensure they are equitable. So, while offering a travel reimbursement benefit in the current climate could be viewed as a political statement, she indicated it’s part of a bigger push to provide equal access to affordable care across the workforce. 

“The travel reimbursement benefit in accessing reproductive services really aligns to the journey that the business community has been on to identify any inequitable access to care and make corrections where possible to advance health equity,” Deaton said. “So, this is really about access to care, whether it’s cancer treatment, reproductive services, or action to preserve access to any medical and mental healthcare.” 

Considerations for Implementation 

While recent legislation and the SCOTUS leak breathed new life into the topic of abortion access, it’s not uncommon for employer-sponsored health plans to cover the procedure, noted Katy Johnson, senior counsel, health policy at the American Benefits Council. For organizations that do cover abortion through their health plans, expanding access to employees in states where restrictions are enacted via a travel benefit is fairly straightforward from a federal law standpoint

Johnson said employers that opt to provide the travel benefit through their group health plan are subject to applicable tax code rules, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). 

Navigating state laws could make offering the benefit a bit more complex, she said. 

“We also need to think about any state laws, and their impact, which can depend on whether the coverage is insured or self-insured,” Johnson said. “I would imagine this will be a fairly dynamic legal landscape and state laws will change and evolve. So employers will need to consider state law limitations and then for employers that are self-insured, any ERISA preemption of those state laws.” 

In this same vein, complications could arise across states in terms of the procedure being covered based on an organization’s plan design. Johnson said organizations should assess the composition of their geographic workforce as it relates to their existing health plan networks and think through potential provider network limitations that would need to be addressed as part of developing a travel reimbursement benefit for abortions. 

“There are questions about how to design the benefit once you get past the hurdle of deciding whether you want to provide it,” Johnson said. “A lot of employers are thinking about how to provide this benefit within the context of the group health plan that they offer, because they understand how the law works in that context and how the information would be protected and how tax and ERISA rules work.”

Deaton concurred that it would behoove employers to have logistics such as these determined with their plan partner before offering a travel reimbursement benefit. 

“Businesses that are focused on equitable coverage are constantly assessing network adequacy and timeliness to high-quality, affordable and equitable care and then taking action where necessary to make those corrections,” Deaton said. 

What also could be causing employers to reexamine how equitable their health plans are is the rise in remote work. WorldatWork’s “Workforce Planning in the Great Resignation Era” survey found that 50% of employees are currently working remotely and 8% of organizations have employees working 100% remotely. 

As more organizations accommodate remote work and expand their geographic talent pool, they are reassessing whether their health plans are equitable across various segments of the workforce in terms of coverage and access, Deaton said. 

“You add the remote workers with the Great Resignation and businesses’ commitment to health equity,” she said, “I think it created this environment where companies have felt compelled to act on legislation that would limit equal access to high-quality, affordable and equitable care for their workers regardless of where they live.” 

About the Author 

Brett Christie.jpg Brett Christie is the managing editor of Workspan Daily. 


About WorldatWork

WorldatWork is a professional nonprofit association that sets the agenda and standard of excellence in the field of Total Rewards. Our membership, signature certifications, data, content, and conferences are designed to advance our members’ leadership, and to help them influence great outcomes for their own organizations.

About Membership

Membership provides access to practical resources, research, emerging trends, a professional network, and career-building education and certification. Learn more and join today.