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Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
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WORKSPAN
FROM THE EDITOR |

Changing Times


I enjoy words (probably a good thing, given my profession). I like learning about their etymology and thinking about which ones capture just the right meaning or emotion.

At the same time, words can be intimidating. They can be used and stretched in new or unexpected ways. Heck, last year Merriam-Webster added a new definition for “ghost.” Now you know what to call it when your house is haunted and when someone abruptly cuts off all contact.

We all face changes in our work that can be exciting … or make us cringe and want to hide under the covers. These days, total rewards professionals have a gamut of horrifying prospects that all seem to circle one point: You’ve got a changing workforce on your hands that wants something different from traditional organization cultures and value propositions.

That’s one sentence composed of 19 words, but it conveys a monolith of thinking, strategy, design and implementation work. It requires a new way of thinking and approaching issues of the day. It’s reminiscent of the transition from a “personnel” department to a “human resources” department, if that transition were something that could be delineated by one key moment in time.

Sexual harassment is at the top of the queue in terms of issues rewards professionals should be considering — if only because it’s at the top of the headlines and top of mind for employees. Anna Mittag’s article addresses how employers need to start thinking differently about the way they approach sexual harassment awareness and training in the workplace. And an employer that turns a blind eye to harassment surely has some cultural issues to work through. I had the pleasure of exercising my writing hand this month, sharing with readers a piece on Baird’s no-asshole rule and the type of culture that supports it. It was enlightening and a solid learning about what I, as an employee, expect from my current and future employers.

John Bremen and Amy DeVylder Levanat also look to the future, delivering a solid case for how work and the workforce are changing, along with the key areas where you’ll deliver value. Lewis Garrad and Jamie Barrette take an insightful (and potentially Big Brother-ish) look at how employers can use everyday work tools like instant messaging and emails to track employee engagement (with a well-placed mention that you’ll want to work with your CIO and legal to ensure you’re mining and using information appropriately).

The world is moving fast, and it requires change. Remember: It’s a quick shift from evolution to revolution. You have a choice to either drive the change your organization needs, or be left behind as the rest of the world moves past you.

Happy Reading,

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