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A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
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Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
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Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
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One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
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Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
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Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
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Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
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Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
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Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
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A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
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Independent Learning
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Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
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60 Days - Anytime
60-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
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WORKSPAN
BACK TO BASICS |

Exec Comp Philosophy Guideposts and Foundations

A successful compensation program, one that drives strategic execution and competitiveness, starts with a guiding philosophy. That’s especially true of executive compensation. Just as companies develop different business strategies, they benefit from different compensation philosophies that respond to their unique circumstances.

The compensation philosophy should take into account three factors: business priorities, management style and organizational culture. As for priorities, the pay structure should fit the company’s financial realities and position in the business cycle. A pay plan that stresses payouts in equity might suit a cash-starved tech startup from the West Coast. A plan that suits a cash-rich consumer-goods maker in Cincinnati might stress more balanced pay elements. A plan stressing leveraged payouts over the long term might fit a turnaround in Boston. Are you an early-days Snap Inc., a Procter & Gamble Co. or a General Electric Co.?

As for management style, the degree of individual differentiation should fit the way the CEO likes to run teams and units. Does the boss insist on team play, all for one and one for all? Or is individual accountability more important? An individual focus works well for finance firms in New York. Group rewards might work for manufacturing firms in the Midwest. Are you a Morgan Stanley or a John Deere?

As for corporate culture, pay prominence should match executive ambitions. Does the executive team rally to the prospect of high-risk, hefty payouts? Or does it respond more to the challenge of company building, career advancement and the chance to “change the world.” Big, leveraged, prescriptive incentives turbocharge some executive teams. More predictable, even payouts in combination with other nonfinancial rewards gratify others. Are you a private equity portfolio company or an electric utility?

With the basics clarified, the philosophy also should include some specifics as to how the plan will work. How (and how much) will the company position pay compared to peers? Should the company peg pay at the median? Or will it pay executives at a higher level?

And how will the company focus executive efforts and rein-force business priorities? Which types of metrics will govern incentive payouts — a mix of financial and operational? What about strategic metrics? How rigorous will your targets be? How highly leveraged your payouts? Will your annual bonus be paid all in cash? Will your long-term incentive pay be paid out in stock, options or long-term cash?

And how much will you adjust your mix of pay elements (base salary, short-term incentives, long-term incentives) based on attracting and retaining talent (paying whatever it takes) or for performance (paying for delivery of results)? Will you lavish up-front cash and stock on rare tech gurus in an AI-driven economy? Or will you pay them in performance-based restricted stock after the new machine-learning-based business takes off? Finally, what are your stock ownership expectations? How much stock will executives have to hold to show they always have skin in the game?

Together, these philosophy components provide guideposts for designing and administering pay — and for communicating compensation plans’ focus to the outside world. Most companies revisit them annually and communicate them in the Compensation Discussion & Analysis. The philosophy is the foundation for building a strong executive compensation program that’s reflective of the company’s business priorities, management style and culture.

Blair Jones Bio Image

Blair Jones is managing director with Semler Brossy Consulting Group LLC. Connect with her on LinkedIn.