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Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials are available online within one business day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access to e-course materials available online within one business day from the date of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
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Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
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WORKSPAN
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

Gender Pay Gaps Are a 'Big Deal'

I loved the Tamara Phillips article in the May 2019 issue (“The Real-World Impact of Gender Pay Gaps”). In fact, in my compensation consulting in my organization, I highlight the numbers a lot with my calculations and recommend managers beef up their offers/adjustments for women when they come to me. I think it’s a big deal, coming from a single mother household and having a wife and a daughter, the most crucial thing I’m working on is letting them know how much of an equal human being they are to boys and men in the world.

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I did have one small highlight in the article: Toward the end, when Tamara talks about “Using Tools to Identify Bias – Compensation,” the third bullet point states “Calculate pay increase using absolute values instead of percentages that can exacerbate previous bias.”

I was just wondering about that because, from my experience, percentages used for increases work best to avoid bias. When we give a 2% increase across the board, managers aren’t looking at which one of their employees are receiving what. However, when we offer a budgeted dollar amount for them to distribute for increases, they generally look at those they’d like to give more/less to and that’s where the bias plays in because a male manager would likely give more money to a male staff employee similar to them “unconsciously,” however, make the “conscious” reason/ basis of high performance, skillset, etc.

Other than that, I learned a lot from your article and implementing some other calculation tools into my decision support system that I use to make pay recommendations.

Thank you,
George Mensah
Senior Compensation Analyst
Rosetta Stone Inc