Close
Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Close
Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
Close
Sorry, you can't add this item to the cart.
You have reached the maximum allowed quantity for purchase in your cart or the item isn't available anymore.
Product successfully added to your cart!
Price
View your cart
Continue shopping
Please note our website will be down this Friday, November 5 from 9pm ET – 11pm ET for routine maintenance. We apologize for any inconvenience.
WORKSPAN
WORKSPAN DAILY |

Peeking at Peers’ Salaries: Finland’s Radical Approach to Pay Transparency

0114-Finland_780w.png


The Finnish government has proposed a new law that would allow the country’s workers to find out what their colleagues are earning if they suspect they are being discriminated against, Reuters recently reported.  

 

Introduced as an effort to help narrow the gender pay gap in the Northern European nation, the bill has been met with criticism from workers’ unions seeking even more pay transparency, and Finland’s largest employers’ organization, which says such a law would actually create more conflicts in the workplace, according to Reuters.  


0114-Finland-KTs.png

 

A coalition led by Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Martin is pushing ahead with the legislation, however.

 

“What is central to the government’s program is the elimination of unjustified pay gaps,” Equality Minister Thomas Blomqvist told Reuters. “They will now be addressed more rigorously.”

 

Blomqvist expects the bill to be passed in parliament before the April 2023 elections in Finland, where women earned 17.2% less than men in 2020, according to a pay equality ranking by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

 

That disparity helped Finland place 37th globally in terms of pay equity — well behind neighboring countries Norway, Denmark and Sweden, which held the eighth, ninth and twelve spots on the list, respectively.

 

A 2018 report from the Finnish Equality Ombudsman finds the factors contributing to the gender pay gap in Finland are similar to those in other Western European nations — segregation of the job market into male- and female-dominated professions, new fathers receiving less parental leave than mothers and women being promoted less frequently than their male counterparts, for example.

 

The measure the Finnish government is planning may be meant to promote pay equity. But compensation experts don’t foresee this approach to pay transparency becoming common in other parts of the world.

 

James Reda, managing director and leader of the executive compensation practice at Gallagher, doesn’t believe that a proposed law like this would ever gain traction elsewhere. And he advises against making peer group comparisons an integral part of compensation strategies.

 

“At some companies, employees are more concerned with how their pay stacks up against others within the organization, while at other companies there is more concern with how pay stacks up against other organizations,” said Reda.

 

“In general, a company should not rely primarily on peer group comparisons in setting pay,” he added. “At best, base salary levels should be compared against a broad-based peer group but should only be used as a general guide for short- and long-term incentive opportunity amounts.”


Tauseef Rahman, a principal and career business leader at Mercer, agrees that allowing workers access to information on their peers’ compensation probably won’t catch on as a common practice in other countries.  

“It’s unlikely that companies would willingly create a situation where workers ask what other colleagues’ are earning, as it would not result in a uniform sharing of information,” said Rahman. “Rather, I suspect that companies would openly publish what each person is paid, or share the specific pay range for all jobs, as some already do.”

 

Taking an approach that puts the onus on employees to ensure pay is fair within the organization is “unlikely to support a strong employee experience,” he added.

 

“Rather, we counsel organizations to make progress on their pay transparency journey to enable a better employee experience. Ultimately, the goal is to have an environment where candidates and employees do not need to ask for other colleagues’ pay, because the information they need to believe that they are paid fairly is proactively provided by the employer.”

 

About the Author


Mark-McGraw (1).jpg  Mark McGraw is the managing editor of Workspan.


About WorldatWork

WorldatWork is a professional nonprofit association that sets the agenda and standard of excellence in the field of Total Rewards. Our membership, signature certifications, data, content, and conferences are designed to advance our members’ leadership, and to help them influence great outcomes for their own organizations.

About Membership

Membership provides access to practical resources, research, emerging trends, a professional network, and career-building education and certification. Learn more and join today.