Close
Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Close
Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
Close
Sorry, you can't add this item to the cart.
You have reached the maximum allowed quantity for purchase in your cart or the item isn't available anymore.
Product successfully added to your cart!
Price
View your cart
Continue shopping
Please note our website will be down this Friday, November 5 from 9pm ET – 11pm ET for routine maintenance. We apologize for any inconvenience.
WORKSPAN
WORKSPAN DAILY |

The Ripple Effect of Quitting for “Better Pay”

Editor’s Note: Workspan Daily will be reproducing a monthly Compensation Café blog post for the benefit of our readers and to encourage further discourse on topics vital to compensation professionals. New to WorldatWork? Please feel free to join the discussion in our Online Community or send your thoughts to workspan@worldatwork.org.

Citing money can be the best excuse for leaving an employer, even if it is untrue. One survey blamed voluntary turnover on income. But when an employment agency surveys financial types on why people leave their jobs, it should come as no surprise that they chose money as the principal motivation for quitting. Of course! These are groups who obsess about money.

Image

Every pay survey published by employment agencies tends to yield excessively high numbers, because it suits their vested interests. The commissions of employment recruiters are based on the size of the pay offers accepted. Reports of high survey rates or high placement salaries can create a self-fulfilling prophesy that convinces their clients to authorize higher starting pay. That raises their commissions while permitting them to fill openings more swiftly because the exaggerated offer rates are far more attractive to candidates than mere actual average or normal median pay amounts.

Even the hiring managers can benefit by “overpaying” new hires, because the inflated salaries to new folks increase the size of the payroll they control, thus raising their value, while simultaneously creating internal pay compression that justifies further salary adjustments to maintain internal equity and to further raise their pay, too.  

Financial executives are trained to see everything in terms of costs, so they are apt to attribute job abandonment to inadequate pay. Their entire professional focus is financial, so they are unlikely to suspect that workers would leave for other reasons. Accountants and CFOs think money is behind everything. If it can be fixed with cash, it is not a problem but merely an expense item … their precise area of expertise.

In reality, everyone tends to quit for a higher-paying job, but they don't start looking for that better pay until they give up on their boss or the company. However, pointing to wages as the excuse for leaving is socially acceptable. Claiming that the new job pays more is a wonderful excuse. It is usually accurate and allows you to remain non-confrontational and inoffensive in your “regretful” resignation message. Nothing wrong with wanting a better income, everyone will approvingly agree. The alternative — telling the full truth about how you only started looking because of your rotten supervisor or unethical organization or dead-end career environment — might cost you a good reference forever. 

Why take an unnecessary risk?

When disgusted workers abandon a bad situation, they rarely want to endanger their entire working future by antagonizing the very people who will be asked to endorse their qualifications in the future. It just isn’t worth it. Besides, that new position generally does offer a higher income … potentially, someday, if not actually immediately. And no one can criticize you for seeking better wages. Indeed, citing “better pay” pleases the people you leave behind. 

It plays right into the hands of managers who are happy to use your exit interview comments to justify the obvious need for higher pay for themselves and their subordinates. Dispensing a bigger payroll pays off in more status and greater compensation for the executives, too, most of the time, so they also smile at the ripple effect of your departure “for more money.”

If management believes that story and makes a counteroffer, it may be rejected; because money is not always the solution to unhappiness at work — it is only the most expensive option. No amount of cash will make up for the problems that caused the decision to leave in the first place.  Even if a counteroffer is accepted, the root causes of the original dissatisfaction still remain. 

High wages and fat salaries may retain otherwise disengaged workers for a while, but they still will leave eventually (mentally/emotionally if not physically) if non-cash motivations are not satisfied.

About the Author

James Brennan Bio Image

James (Jim) Brennan is an independent compensation advisor with extensive total rewards experience in most industries.

This article was first published at Compensation Café on Aug. 12, 2020.


About WorldatWork

WorldatWork is a professional nonprofit association that sets the agenda and standard of excellence in the field of Total Rewards. Our membership, signature certifications, data, content, and conferences are designed to advance our members’ leadership, and to help them influence great outcomes for their own organizations.

About Membership

Membership provides access to practical resources, research, emerging trends, a professional network, and career-building education and certification. Learn more and join today.