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Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
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Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
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Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
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One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
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Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
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Highly Interactive
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Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
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E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
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Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
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Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
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A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
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Independent Learning
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Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
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120 Days - Anytime
120-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
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Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
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WORKSPAN
BACK TO BASICS |

Tips for Completing a Compensation Survey


Compensation surveys provide the vital data necessary to help create compensation plans that will attract, retain and motivate the talent your organization needs to succeed. What follows are a few tips to help you get through the survey.

Tip No. 1: Use the Survey Company’s Resources
The company running your survey will assign an account manager. Get to know this person well. Pepper them with questions. You’ll receive a tool (often an Excel or similar spreadsheet) to submit your data. Scrutinize each column heading and be sure you understand exactly what belongs in each column. Know exactly what’s being asked for — and what isn’t — before you start filling in blanks.

Tip No. 2: Know the Important Dates
The survey will have an effective date for current data, a specific timeframe for historical data and usually a drop-dead submission deadline. The effective date for current data provides a snapshot of the information about your employees as of a particular date. The survey will have an effective date, often Jan. 1 of the current year.

The timeframe is the look-back period to request your historical data. This usually is the previous calendar year. You probably will have to ask payroll for a report of the actual data, so make sure you have the timeframe correct the first time.

While some surveys are evergreen — taking in data from participants throughout the year and frequently updating their databases — many surveys collect and publish just once per year. A survey often will allow a company to buy access to its data without participation, but at borderline-extortionist (ahem, much higher) prices.

Tip No. 3: Gather Data and Make Friends
Finishing that survey is a big job, and you’re going to need some help from other people who have projects of their own.

Make friends with Payroll — they’re the ones who get you those actual bonus amounts and commission payments. HR operations are the gatekeepers of HRIS, which is where you’ll get the needed employee data. Make sure the HR ops team saves the report for re-use, because you will be doing this again soon.

If sales roles are a part of your survey, you’ll want to get to know the sales operations team, specifically the people in charge of sales quotas and plan documents. Explain your exact needs, give them ample time and follow up as needed.

Tip No. 4: Determine the Best Match for Jobs at Your Company
The job description is probably the most important element. The survey will have a list of jobs for data collection that will include a brief description of the job. Determine the best match for the jobs at your company. Make a list of the job titles used in your organization and find the most current job description for each role. Update out-of-date or non- existent job descriptions, if possible; schedule time with a manager to discuss needed changes.

Tip No. 5: Accept That You Probably Will Not Match Every Job
You’ll likely find survey descriptions of jobs to be rather bereft of nuance and fine detail. When matching your job description to a blurb on a survey, most of the time you’ll need to be satisfied with about a 70% to 80% match of the job’s main responsibilities. Not every role will have a match that rises to this level, and that’s OK. When you decide on a match, keep track of the job code for that role. Next year’s survey will be much easier if you have a record of how you previously matched jobs.

Scott Boynton Bio Image

Scott Boynton, CCP, is the compensation manager at CareerBuilder.com.