Close
Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
120 Days - Anytime
120-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Close
Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
Close
Sorry, you can't add this item to the cart.
You have reached the maximum allowed quantity for purchase in your cart or the item isn't available anymore.
Product successfully added to your cart!
Price
View your cart
Continue shopping
Please note our website will be down this Friday, November 5 from 9pm ET – 11pm ET for routine maintenance. We apologize for any inconvenience.
WORKSPAN
WORKSPAN DAILY |

Black Women’s Equal Pay Day 2021: Wage Equity Can’t Wait


pixelfit / iStock


The gender pay gap is a long-standing, persistent problem.

 

In 1963, the Equal Pay Act was signed into law, with the goal of wiping out wage disparity based on sex.

 

At that time, women working full-time made, on average, 59 cents for every dollar that men earned. Nearly 60 years later, pay equity still eludes us.

 

A Pew Research Center analysis, for example, revealed that women earned 84 cents for every dollar that men earned in 2020.

 

The gap is even wider among Black women, who make less on average, taking home 63 cents for every dollar that White, non-Hispanic men make.

 

Aug. 3 marks the approximate day that a Black woman has to work into a given year to make what the average White, non-Hispanic man made in the previous year. In other words, Black women must work 20 months to make what White men make in 12 months.

 

That’s why Aug. 3 is also designated as Black Women’s Equal Pay Day 2021, designed to draw attention to this disparity, and to urge organizations to take steps to rectify it.

 

Many companies are well aware of the gender pay gap, and the majority of them are doing something to address it, according to WorldatWork and Korn Ferry data.

 

In a 2020 analysis, the organizations found 60% of more than 700 responding companies saying they are “taking action” on pay equity.

 

What sort of action? The largest number (85%) indicated that their organization has conducted a pay equity analysis or was in the midst of performing one. Another 75% said their companies were reviewing job classifications and their job evaluation and grading processes. The same number said their organizations were making pay equity adjustments, with 65% reporting they were assessing their pay equity strategy, design and administration.

 

Still, much work remains to be done, and progress has been slow for decades.

 

Consider that the real median earnings of women have fallen short of men’s earnings by an estimated $700,000 to $2 million over the past 40 years, according to the National Committee on Pay Equity, which estimates that women won’t achieve pay equity until 2059.

 

Equal Rights Advocates (ERA) is one organization offering a host of Black Women’s Equal Pay Day events and resources geared toward helping to step up the pace.

 

For example, ERA’s Black Women’s Equal Pay Day toolkit includes a number of planned activities and events, as well as sample social media messages that others can use to promote the day.

 

One of those events is “Women Employed: Ensuring an Equitable Recovery for Black Women.” During an hour-long chat, (1-2 p.m. EST), Women Employed CEO Cherita Ellens and author, political analyst and White House correspondent April Ryan will discuss the work that must be done to dismantle systemic barriers, grow the economic power of Black women during the recovery from COVID-19 and beyond, and how to close the wealth gap at the intersection of race and gender.

 

Later in the day (3 p.m. EST), Equal Rights Advocates will team up with Equal Pay Today, the National Urban League and the Institute for Women’s Policy Research to host “Black Women Can’t Wait,” a webinar focusing on race and the economy coming out of the pandemic and beyond.

 

WorldatWork recently spoke with Brad Hill, principal at Clearwater Human Capital, for a pay equity-focused feature that’s set to appear in the fourth-quarter issue of #evolve, which publishes in mid-October.

 

Hill discussed why the gender pay gap persists, and what needs to happen to eliminate it.

 

The biggest factor driving gender pay inequity — not just for Black women, but for all women — continues to be cost, he told us.

 

“Where does the money come from to adjust inequities? There are many competing objectives vying for a limited pool of annual pay increase dollars: paying a living wage, providing cost of living increases, paying at market, paying for performance, addressing pay inequities. Until achieving pay equity becomes as or more important than paying at market or paying for performance, it is unlikely to be eradicated.”

 

That said, Hill reckoned that “most organizations understand and accept the need for pay equity, so we have a victory there. However, many of these same organizations aren’t clever enough to figure out how to achieve pay equity on a 3% merit increase budget, and it never seems to be the right time to pony up additional funds to remedy the inequities.

 

“Pay equity has a cost associated with it,” he concluded. “And until organizations — and owners/shareholders — are willing to put their money where their mouth is, inequities will be around for years to come.”

 

About the Author

 Mark McGraw is the managing editor of Workspan.

 


About WorldatWork

WorldatWork is a professional nonprofit association that sets the agenda and standard of excellence in the field of Total Rewards. Our membership, signature certifications, data, content, and conferences are designed to advance our members’ leadership, and to help them influence great outcomes for their own organizations.

About Membership

Membership provides access to practical resources, research, emerging trends, a professional network, and career-building education and certification. Learn more and join today.